WaterWorks News: Water shortages, EPA proposes drinking water rule, RAMSCO buys Jones Water Supply

October 2010 Vol. 65 No. 10

EPA approves Iowa’s list of impaired waters
EPA has approved Iowa’s 2008 list of impaired waters. This decision will help the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) set priorities for restoration activities to improve water quality in the coming years.

With this action, EPA is approving Iowa’s decision to include 183 waters and remove 54 waters from the impaired waters list, bringing the total number of impaired waters in the state to 434.

EPA’s Aug. 3 decision letter provides a more detailed description of EPA’s review and the basis for this action. The decision letter, including the 2008 impaired waters list, is available at epa.gov/region07/news_events/legal.

New Jersey invests in clean water, environmental projects
In a news release issued by the New Jersey Assembly Republicans, New Jersey Governor Christie signed into law two bills aimed at assisting public authorities in their efforts to maintain and improve their clean water and drinking water infrastructures.

Assemblywoman Nancy Munoz, R-Essex, Morris, Somerset and Union, co-sponsored both bills that appropriate and authorize over $800 million in low-interest financing that will be available to ensure that projects identified on New Jersey's Clean Water Project Priority List and Drinking Water Priority List are completed.
Under the new law, the New Jersey Environmental Trust is empowered to make loans to the sponsors of over 180 environmental infrastructure projects as well as 13 clean water and four drinking water ventures.
The financing, administered through the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Financing Program, will make available approximately $549 million for clean water project loans and $272 million for drinking water project loans, with the federal government picking up at least half of the cost.

The loan program has historically saved project sponsors anywhere from 25 to 30 percent in financing costs.

The infrastructure projects also will create hundreds of jobs throughout the state.
More than 75 applications from cities, towns, counties, authorities, utilities and private associations already are being considered this year for much-needed money for clean water and drinking water infrastructure projects, in a program that dates to the 1980s and has previously financed 749 projects totaling almost $5 billion.